Tag Archives: Writer X

Writer X: Win Forever? Not With Tarvaris

*Editor’s note: Periodically, we will be presenting you work from accomplished scribes behind the guise of the mysterious Writer X. The idea here is that we give our talented journalists the freedom to say what they want about who they want without fear of retribution. Were they to pen these thoughts under their own names, they could face serious repercussions. Writer X, however, is perfectly immune to it all. Enjoy the candor.

“He knows the offense.”

That’s what we’ve heard over and over and f**king over.

Tarvaris Jackson was signed this offseason by Pete Carroll, John Schneider, and the Seattle Seahawks to replace Matt (sic; Matthew) Hasselbeck to be the new quarterback for a team coming off an absurd playoff berth and first round victory. Charlie Whitehurst, whom the team traded a third round pick for just a year prior and led the team to a must-win Week 17 victory over the St. Louis Rams, was left completely out of the equation.

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Writer X: Blame Ichiro

*Editor’s note: Welcome to our first installment of Writer X, a column written by anonymous contributors for your reading pleasure. Periodically, we will be presenting you work from accomplished scribes behind the guise of the mysterious Writer X. The idea here is that we give our talented journalists the freedom to say what they want about who they want without fear of retribution. Were they to pen these thoughts under their own names, they could face serious repercussions. Writer X, however, is perfectly immune to it all. Enjoy the candor.

Obviously, the Mariners blow homeless guys again this year.

Yeah, sure, they made the first half interesting. But they did it with ungodly pitching that was wholly unsustainable. This has been a familiar refrain over the last few seasons.

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Operation Writer X

You may know about ESPN The Magazine’s Player X. It’s a column that runs in every issue of The Mag and features an anonymous athlete scribing candidly beneath the guise of Player X.

The appeal of the article is epic in nature and the idea itself is revolutionary. Allowing inside sources to divulge classified information without having to worry about repercussion is an incredible feat that benefits the consumer more than anyone else. In this case, the consumer is the reader. And the reader can walk away from each of these confessionals feeling enlightened by what they’ve just digested.

Now imagine you’re a professional journalist.

At one point in your life, you loved to write. It was great. It was thrilling. It brought you joy.

But then something changed.

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