Tag Archives: Sonics

One Year Later, Oklahoma City Can Still Shove It Up Their Collective Posterior (or Ass, for you linguistically-challenged Thunder fans)

sonicslogoForget journalistic objectivity. Oklahoma City can take their basketball team and shove it right up their behinds, broad side first. Now go cry about it, whiners.

Fact is, Thunder fans can’t quite comprehend why Seattleites are still upset over the hijacking of our NBA team. You know, the one we had for over 40 years.

Continue reading One Year Later, Oklahoma City Can Still Shove It Up Their Collective Posterior (or Ass, for you linguistically-challenged Thunder fans)

The Top 11: Christnukkazaa gifts that Seattle sports fans want, #1

Our first ten gifts can be found here and here.  Also, we’ve added this week’s poll on our first ten gifts and we’re asking you to choose your favorite. The poll can be found on the left side of your screen in our sidebar. And now here’s our number one Seattle sports-related gift for this holiday season.
1. Clay Bennett brand luggage. So you happen to be going away for awhile. You’re going to need luggage to carry all of your belongings, and Oklahoma City Thunder owner Clay Bennett wants to help you out. Clay is an expert when it comes to long-distance travel, which is why he has released a new line of luggage featuring his namesake for the holiday season.

Clay Bennett brand luggage is made from the highest quality materials on earth. Whether you’re looking for a briefcase made of albino panda skin, an orca-lined suitcase, or an American bald eagle feather fanny pack, Clay Bennett offers it all. The Clay line will make no sacrifices and cut no corners when it comes to doing what’s best for Clay’s supporters.

And Clay Bennett brand comes in a variety of shapes and sizes as well. Whether you want to tote a laptop or heck, maybe even a whole basketball team, the Clay collection can handle it all!

We’ve surveyed thousands upon thousands of Oklahomans to see how they feel about the new Clay Bennett luggage collection and here’s what they had to say.

Tulsa native Johnnie Rae Jenkins, plumber: “With Clay Bennett, I was able to pack enough luggage for a two-week vacation to visit my aunt and bruncle (brother-uncle) up north. My eight kids and fifteen-year-old wife came too!”

Piedmont native Darby Hootengrass, restaurateur: “Clay Bennett brand luggage helped me pack up my single-wide and move it up the highway to a new spot where I now make my home.”

Fairview native Esther Clumpett, candy shop owner: “At Clumpett’s Candy, we specialize in making fudge. It used to be so difficult for me to transport my fudge to all our locations around the state, but with my new luggage it’s become so much easier. Now I’m able to take as much fudge from store to store as I want. With Clay Bennett, fudgepacking has never been so easy! Thank you, Clay!”

You see! Clay Bennett brand luggage can do it all! Don’t miss out on the number one gift for this holiday season. Act now and Clay Bennett luggage can be yours!

The Top 11: Christnukkazaa gifts that Seattle sports fans want, #11-7

We know you’re having a tough time finding the perfect gift for the person who has everything on your list this holiday season. That’s why here at SSN we’ve compiled a list of the Top 11 gifts that Seattle sports fan want to find waiting for them on Christnakuzaa morning. If you need some shopping advice, look no further than right here. Enjoy.

11. 2009 Seattle Sonics Team Calendar. If you’re having a hard time letting go, the 2009 Sonics team calendar is the gift for you. Apparently, the NBA produces these things months in advance or else just didn’t get the memo that our team no longer exists. Either that or this is David Stern’s idea of a sick joke.
Whatever the case may be, the ’09 Sonics team calendar is the perfect gift for any fan. Cherish it as a memento of days gone by hanging it on your wall and letting an Earl Watson ill-advised jumper stare at you for 30 days. Or take it outside with your David Stern dartboard, Oklahoma state flag, Mouhamed Sene replica jersey, and Aubrey McLendon souvenir stock portfolio and burn that sucker while you perform a ritual tribal dance around the flames. No matter how you use your Sonics calendar, I guarantee you’ll enjoy the crap out of it.

10. Prize cannon. If you haven’t been to a major professional sporting event recently, you may not be familiar with the prize cannon. Picture a rocket launcher powered by air that fires t-shirts, sub sandwiches, rounded souvenirs, and more, and you have the prize cannon.
Why would the prize cannon make a great gift, you ask? More like why wouldn’t it make a great gift.The prize cannon gives you power beyond what you’ve ever imagined. Let’s say the neighbor’s dog is taking a dump on your lawn again. Just fill your prize cannon up with your ammo of choice (I suggest tennis balls, rolled-up socks, or potatoes) and let Fido have it! Boo-yah doggie, you won’t be pooping here anymore!
Another scenario: the Usain Bolt of bank robbers happens to be fleeing the cops on foot past your house. A battalion of officers follow behind him desperately trying to catch up. Seeing you, good samaritan, sitting in your driveway with your prize cannon in tow, the police signal for your assistance. You lift the brim of the Indiana Jones hat you happen to be wearing that day, look up from your Mai-Tai, and nod slowly but surely towards them. It’s gonna be ok, coppers. You pull four softballs out of your ammunition pack and load them into your cannon. Unaware of what he’s about to endure, the bank robber is sprinting towards you with a smug look on his face. You aim your cannon straight at his testes, pull the trigger four times–POOSH! POOSH! POOSH! POOSH!–and justice is served. You’re a hero, and you have your prize cannon to thank. Good going, gift-giver.
9. Tyrone Willingham talking action figure. Life-size? No. Life-like. Oh yeah. The talking Ty action hero stands 11 inches tall (we swear it’s not life-size) and wants to be your friend. Your buddies may have GI Joe, but you have a polarizing figure that knows how to ostracize boosters, fans and media members! Take that, Jimmy from down the street! Special features include:
-Three interchangeable outfits. There’s “Early Ty” with the swest look (that’s sweater-vest for those of you not up on your fashion lingo), featuring a purple UW swest and a pair of 1995 Oakley M-frame sunglasses. Then we have “Warm Weather” Ty, with his oversized white polo and weekend khakis. And just added we have “’08 Apple Cup Ty” with the “I don’t care anymore so I’m gonna where what I wore to bed last night” look, plus a beanie.
-Judo chop arm action. Whether you want to defend yourself against enemies or just let out some rage by throwing a clipboard, headset, or untimely challenge flag, the Ty judo chop allows you to act out on your bad decisions whenever you want!
-Talking pull string. The Ty action figurine says one thing and one thing only: “Okay,” as in “Our boys played hard today, okay?” Of course, you can ask your Ty doll anything you want and he’ll answer you the same every time. Ask Ty if he wants to save the world. He’ll say “okay.” Then ask Ty if he wants to go swim in your toilet. “Okay.” He’s cool with everything!
8. Shaun Alexander commemorative kneepads. Do you tend to fall down a lot for no particular reason? If so, then the Shaun Alexander commemorative kneepads may be the gift for you. There’s really no explaining how gravity can occasionally affect even the best of us, and we all know the ground can be a rough and abrasive landing place at times. That’s why we recommend buying protection, and protection starts and ends with your knees.
Just ask Shaun. He used to be a 1000-yard rusher with the ability to power through opposing defensive lines. Then he signed a big contract and gravity took its hold on the once-proud running back. Pretty soon Alexander was collapsing at the first sign of contact, and now? Now he’s unemployed and likely done with football. I bet he wishes he had these kneepads.
Even if you’re not prone to taking dives right now, the SA kneepads are recommended for individuals who are set to sign contracts they probably can’t live up to, or for those who like to sell out their teammates by giving less than 100%.
7. PJ Carlesimo choke collar for dogs. He’s out of work and looking to maximize on his fame. That’s why former Sonics coach PJ Carlesimo has unveiled his line of pet accessories for the Christmas season. The Carlesimo short leash is a popular item, but the one we really like is the PJ choke collar for dogs.
Made of stainless steel and uniquely crafted to look like Latrell Sprewell’s hands, the PJ choke collar is perfect for the petowner training a new puppy around the house. Besides producing an obedient, well-behaved pooch, the PJ choke collar can also be used as a fashion accessory for aspiring assistant coaches and for men who just want to say “Hey, take a look at my huge beard.” You may not be your company’s next CEO, but you’re gonna try to work your way to the top before being put back in your place by all the people you’ve pissed off along the way.
#6-2 will be appearing in Sunday’s updates, #1 on Monday.

The Top 11: Seattle draft busts of the past 25 years, #11-7

There have been plenty of draft busts in Seattle sports history, which is why we had to limit our findings to the past 25 years. Whether it was the Sonics, Seahawks, or Mariners making the selection, our local scouting departments seemingly had a knack for unearthing untalented players. By the way, do you know how hard it was to find images of some of these players? Especially live-action images, near impossible. Anyways, here’s our list of the Top 11 people you can’t help but shake your head at. Enjoy.

11. The Trifecta (Robert Swift, Johan Petro, Mouhamed Sene). Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me; fool me three times, I must be the Sonics front office staff on draft night. 2004: Robert Swift. 2005: Johan Petro. 2006: Mouhamed Sene. What do these three names have in common? Let’s see:

  • All three are former Seattle Sonics first-round draft picks.
  • All three are centers.
  • All three are over 7′ tall.
  • All three spend more time on the bench than they do playing.
  • All three are now Oklahoma City’s curse of a problem, and yet we’d take them back in a heartbeat.

Let’s start at the beginning with Robert Swift, class of 2004. Right away there were problems with Swift. I remember watching the ’04 Draft and hearing Swift’s name announced by David Stern, then immediately thinking, Who? Swift wasn’t present at the venue, so there was no visual of the guy the Sonics had selected. Quick cut to the studio analysis. Usually you have the consensus “great pick/really fills a need” garbage from the overpaid talking heads, but this one was a stretch even for the eternal optimists. I remember someone labeling him a “project,” which in draft-speak is a nice way of saying “you’re doomed.” And they were right, Swifty was one hell of a project.

To top it off, Swift is a non-European white guy, which is a horrible, horrible sign. Try to think of five really good non-European white guys in the NBA right now……..it’s difficult, I know, but keep trying………Steve Nash, yes……Brad Miller, but that’s a stretch………Mike Dunleavy, Jr., also a stretch……..ok, so the consensus is you can’t fill out an All-Star roster with non-European white guys, which basically begs the question why draft one in the first place unless he’s the next Larry Bird? Oh wait, hold on a second. Apparently the next Larry Bird was already drafted, and has yet to pan out so far in his third season. Goes by the name of Adam Morrison. Whoops, never mind then, I guess even the next Larry Bird isn’t a draftable non-European white guy. Moving on.

So here comes the 2005 draft and the prospect of improving from a year ago. Stuck with the 27th overall pick after the Sonics’ one playoff season in the past decade, the team drafts French center Johan Petro. There are about a million things wrong with drafting French center Johan Petro, but why go into it? Let’s just move on to 2006 (although it should be noted that of the three big men, Petro has shown the most promise thus far).

Mouhamed Saer Sene. If you are (or were, I guess, at this point) a Sonics fan and hear this name, chances are you cringe. Sene was the epitome of a mistake the moment he was selected and everyone knew it. At least you could pin the “project” label on Swift and Petro. Sene wasn’t a “project,” he was “raw.” “Raw” is the draft equivalent of “this guy isn’t American, isn’t European, and isn’t Yao Ming, so what the hell is he?” “Raw” means that you, the player, aren’t even on anyone’s draft board. The Sonics made this raw pick because, in layman’s terms, another team baited them into it. They claimed they “had to” pick Sene because they couldn’t afford to let him drop to an opponent lower in the draft, who supposedly would have selected Sene and used him against the Sonics in some way…I guess.

So here we were with the 7-footer from Senegal, a young Dikembe Mutombo, soon-to-be-fired experts said. Sene’s biggest claim to fame was a 7’8″ wingspan which allowed him to touch the rim standing flat-footed. Interestingly enough, he carried that flat-footed approach into games which made him quite useless on either end of the floor. Naturally, he blocked a few shots here and there, but so did Shawn Bradley and Georghe Muresan back in the day. Long story short, in his two years on the job in Seattle, Sene just didn’t play, and when he did it was for the minor league Idaho Stampede of the NBDL and not the Sonics.

Time for a side note. When Sene was selected, did anyone else immediately think of the movie “The Air Up There?” Because I did, and I could picture Kevin Bacon going to Africa to find Sene and bring him to America to play for a team here, just like in the movie. And not only that, but dominating alongside Sene on a dirt basketball court after having his lower abdomen sliced open in a tribal ritual to indoctrinate him into the group. Maybe it’s just me.

Of course, we don’t have to worry about The Trifecta anymore. Now they languish on the bench of the Oklahoma City Thunder.

10. Ryan Christianson. Realizing the clock was ticking on catcher Dan Wilson, the Mariners used their 1999 first-round draft pick on a high school catcher by the name of Ryan Christianson. The #11 overall pick in a draft that produced the likes of Josh Beckett and Josh Hamilton, among many others, Christianson was labeled the catcher of the future for the big club and set on the fast track to the Major Leagues. Unfortunately, Christianson’s fast track wasn’t very fast at all, and he derailed almost immediately, spending three years in Single-A ball at the outset of his career.

By 2005, Christianson was in his second stint with the Triple-A Tacoma Rainiers, on the cusp of making the big show, when he tested positive for steroids. That effectively ended his Mariners career and Christianson was released prior to the end of the season.

Christianson was last spotted as a member of the St. Louis Cardinals Triple-A affiliate in 2007.

9. Sherell Ford. Where the heck is Sherell Ford? Honestly. Does anyone know? If you know, please tell me, because I’ve been Googling Ford for an hour and he’s disappeared off the face of the earth. I can at least break down what we do know about Sherell Ford, international man of mystery.

Ford, out of the University of Illinois-Chicago, was the 26th overall pick in the 1995 NBA Draft. At that point in the draft, there aren’t hugely outrageous expectations placed on players. You just kind of hope for the best and assume you’ll get a two- or three-year rookie contract out of whomever you select. In Ford’s case, 28 games was all the Sonics got, good for 90 total points, most coming in garbage time.

A 6’7″ swingman expected to fill a void at the shooting guard/small forward positions, Ford essentially just filled a void on the payroll. He didn’t even last on the bench after a season, and beyond that rookie year, Ford never played in the NBA again.

According to his Wikipedia page, Ford was last spotted in 2006 when a Chicago ABA franchise invited him to take part in a tryout for their expansion team. The franchise has since folded. No word on whether Ford made the team or not.

8. Rick Mirer. You would think Mirer would be higher up on this list, but he’s here at #8 for two reasons: 1) the Seahawks actually managed to get four semi-productive seasons out of him and 2) when they finally gave up on Mirer, they managed to get a first-round pick in return for him, which is pretty amazing in and of itself. Mirer did try his hardest to become the very best bust he could be though, there’s no denying that.

The second overall pick in the 1993 NFL Draft, right after Washington State quarterback Drew Bledsoe, Mirer was supposed to be a franchise savior for whichever team ended up with his services. Hyped as the next Joe Montana, Mirer more closely resembled Hannah Montana during his tenure with the club. The only thing he possessed similar to that of Joe Montana’s was a strong arm…which he used to deposit balls into the hands of cornerbacks and safeties. In his four years in Seattle, Mirer amassed 56 interceptions to just 41 touchdown passes.

Luckily for the Hawks, the 1997 Chicago Bears were a passer-desperate team willing to do anything for a starting quarterback, which Mirer technically was. Packaged with a fourth-round pick, Mirer was on his way to Chicago with a first-rounder coming West to Seattle. With their two 1997 first-round picks, the Hawks selected cornerback Shawn Springs and left tackle Walter Jones, making Mirer a pretty valuable bargaining chip.

Mirer remained on NFL rosters until 2005, when he unofficially retired. He hasn’t played since.

7. Patrick Lennon. In evaluating Major League draft prospects, scouts will always tell you to avoid guys who have “slow” skills. Slow skills are those which don’t lend themselves to athleticism, per se, but are rather baseball-specific skills that tend to decline rapidly once a player ages or makes the leap to the next level of competition. Examples of slow skills are proficient power but low contact ability; lack of speed on the basepaths; and the inability to play the middle positions on the field (shortstop, second base, center field). Patrick Lennon was a slow-skilled player. And yet somehow, the Mariners found it in their hearts to draft him eighth overall in the 1986 June amateur draft.

It should be noted that Lennon didn’t appear in a Major League uniform until 1991, five years after he was drafted. That he even appeared in a big-league clubhouse is pretty remarkable considering the fact that he just wasn’t any good at baseball. In the nine games Lennon was a part of in ’91, five came as the DH, which is a ridiculously bad omen for a young player. He recorded one hit, a double, in eight at-bats that season, posting a .125 batting average.

In 1992, Lennon spent the majority of the year in Triple-A before earning another late-season call-up. He appeared in one game, recording two at-bats and going hitless. Unfortunately for trickLe (I like to call him trickLe, it’s a hybrid of Patrick and Lennon, it’s like A-Rod, and is used to exemplify how out of control the hybrid nickname has become), that was the last time he’d ever appear in uniform as a Seattle Mariner. As soon as the season was over the M’s released their one-time first-round selection and he was quickly signed by the expansion Colorado Rockies. Interestingly enough, Lennon was released by the Rockies before the team ever played a game and he wouldn’t appear in the Majors again until 1996 with Kansas City.

Lennon managed to appear in 81 more big-league games in his post-Mariner career before hanging it up at the age of 31 following the 1999 season.

The Top 11: Seattle sports heroes, #6-2

Heroes #11-7 can be found here. They are as follows: 11, 1995 Mariners supporting cast; 10, Ichiro Suzuki; 9, Brandon Roy; 8, Mike Holmgren; 7, Lenny Wilkens.

6. Steve Largent. The former Seahawks wide receiver was arguably this city’s first superstar athlete. He became Seattle’s first true Hall of Famer in 1992, after a thirteen-year career that saw him leave the game in 1989 as the NFL’s career leader in receptions (819), reception yards (13,089), and touchdown receptions (100).

Despite the national accolades Largent received at the back end of his career, he arrived in Seattle inconspicuously in 1976 after a trade with the Houston Oilers. A star wideout at the University of Tulsa, Largent wasn’t selected until the fourth round of the ’76 NFL draft. Prior to the start of the regular season the Oilers sent Largent to the Hawks in exchange for a 1977 eighth-round pick. There may never have been a better trade in Seattle history.

Following his football career, Largent turned his national stardom into a successful foray into politics. Beginning in 1994, Largent served in the U.S. House of Representatives as a member of Oklahoma’s first district, but resigned his seat in 2002 when he took an unsuccesful run for the office of governor.

In addition to his records and Hall of Fame selection, Largent was also a seven-time Pro Bowler and was chosen as a member of the NFL’s 1980’s All-Decade Team.

5. Lou Piniella. When Piniella came to Seattle in 1993, interest in his Mariners ballclub piqued, but expectations remained low. In 1992, behind manager Bill Plummer, the Mariners had put together one of their worst seasons in history, finishing 64-98, despite a roster brimming with talent. With younger versions of Ken Griffey, Jr., Edgar Martinez (the 1992 American League batting champ), Jay Buhner, and Randy Johnson, the Mariners were on the verge of putting it all together but needed a leader to show them the way. Piniella became that leader.

Piniella’s impact on the team was immediate. The team put together their first winning season in seventeen years of existence with an 82-80 finish in 1993. They took a nosedive in the strike-shortened season of ’94, finishing 49-63, but were bailed out in a sense when playoffs were cancelled anyways. The 1995 season brought renewed hope, new players, and a new attitude to the Kingdome. Sweet Lou managed to get the most out of his team that year, sending the Mariners to the playoffs for the first time in their history and essentially saving baseball in Seattle.

When he wasn’t winning ballgames, Lou was winning over fans and players alike with his on-field tantrums. He would throw bases, kick dirt, toss his hat, yell and scream all in a futile effort to change a seemingly bad call. It was one of his finer points.

Lou stuck with the M’s for seven seasons after that miracle ’95 run, but departed following the 2002 campaign to move closer to his home in Florida. Upon returning to the Emerald City with his visiting Tampa Bay Devil Rays club shortly thereafter, Piniella was greeted with a standing ovation and even gave addressed the crowd in red carpet fashion before the game.

Piniella is the manager that all Mariners skippers have been and forever will be compared to. He may not have won it all with this team, but he won over the fans of the city and kept a Major League team entrenched here for years to come.

4. Don James. When Don James resigned as head coach of the Washington football team prior to the 1993 season, he left college football as one of the last men in a dying breed. James was the type of head coach you rarely see in today’s game. His intensity and passion was visibly reflected on the field by his players, who, despite an age gap between mentor and tutor, played the disciplined, hard-nosed style of football that their coach demanded of them. James was a man who could command both fear and respect, which allowed him the luxury of eighteen solid seasons on Montlake as the leader of the Dawgs.

The Dawgfather emerged as the man to replace another icon, head coach Jim Owens, in 1975 after four years at Kent State University. He wasn’t the biggest name, nor had the most impressive resume, but at the age of 43 was ready to make the leap to a major Division-I school and happened to be the right guy at the right time.

James’ first two seasons at Husky Stadium were the definition of average. He compiled an 11-11 overall record over the ’75 and ’76 campaigns and couldn’t find a way to a bowl game. That all changed in 1977 when the Huskies rose to prominence, going 10-2 and becoming Rose Bowl champions. Following that season, James would take the Dawgs to 13 more bowls in his fifteen remaining years as head coach. His career apexed in 1991 when the Huskies won a share of the national championship.

Though he’s been retired for over fifteen years, the Huskies are still searching for the man to replace Don James. The team is now searching for their fifth head coach since James’ departure and to hear people talk about the Dawgfather, one would assume he had just resigned last week. Like Lou Piniella with the Mariners, James will now and forever be the coach that all other Husky coaches are compared to.

3. Gary Payton. Most heroes complement their achievements with humility, affability, politeness, and a sense of respect for others. Not Payton. Built like the one and only foil to all that embodies heroism, GP was a loudmouth, trash-talking, in-your-face gamer who never took a play off. He built his reputation on attitude and intensity, and would eventually become arguably one of the greatest players in NBA history.

Big for a point guard, Payton, at 6’4″, was the second overall pick by the Sonics in the 1990 NBA Draft. Coming out of Oregon State University, the wiry Payton was expected to team up with power forward and 1989 first-round selection Shawn Kemp to form an inside-out, one-two punch. The duo would do just that over the course of the next seven years, taking the Sonics to the playoffs in the final five seasons they played together.

After Kemp’s departure in 1997, Payton would last almost six more years in Seattle before being traded for Ray Allen in the middle of the ’02-’03 season. To this day, Payton is among the top three in fourteen different major statistical categories in Sonics franchise history, including being the leader in points scored (18,207), steals (2107), assists (7384), and games played (999). Payton eventually went on to win an NBA championship with the Miami Heat in 2006, but still considers himself a Sonic at heart. He helped lead a rally this past year to keep the Sonics in Seattle, and continues to be a prominent figure in the Emerald City despite making his home in Las Vegas.

2. Edgar Martinez. Over the course of a professional career that began in 1982 and didn’t end until 2004, Edgar combined 22 years as a member of the Seattle Mariners organization with Hall of Fame numbers to become one of the most beloved sports figures in this city’s history.

He first appeared on the scene in 1987 as a pinch-runner, slender, with a mustache that resembled a small rodent. He wouldn’t crack the everyday lineup until 1990, after starting third baseman Jim Presley was traded to Atlanta. Over the course of the next fifteen seasons, Edgar would play in seven All-Star games, win five Silver Slugger awards, and collect two AL batting titles (1992 and 1995).

But even if you took away all the great years, the statistics, and the achievements, Edgar’s meaning to this city could simply be summed up in one moment. The Double.

The Double stands as one of the greatest moments in Seattle sports history. Like Joe Carter’s walk-off home run to win the 1993 World Series, Michael Jordan’s push-off jumper over Bryon Russell in the 1998 NBA Finals, or Dwight Clark’s “The Catch” in 1982, The Double was a once-in-a-lifetime play that came to define an entire team’s season in one instant.

1995. Game 5. American League Division Series. Bottom of the 11th inning. Down 5-4. Runners on first and second. The opponent was the hated New York Yankees. The pitcher was Yankee ace Jack McDowell, brought in out of the bullpen to close the door and send New York to the ALCS. Mariner second baseman Joey Cora stood on second, Ken Griffey, Jr. on first. Cora could score to tie the game on a single. Junior, with his speed, could possibly score on a double. Edgar emerged in the batter’s box and assumed his stance, hands held high, the head of the bat pointing towards the pitcher’s mound, left foot raised up from the ground, weight back, neck cocked, squinting. McDowell came set, checked the runners, and delivered. As if in slow motion, Edgar uncoiled from his statuesque pose and released his bat through the zone. Smoothly, effortlessly he connected with McDowell’s fastball. A line drive down the left field line. Cora scored easily. Here was Griffey, now, steaming around third base, being waved in by a frantic Sam Perlozzo. Yankee catcher Jim Leyritz positioned himself in front of the plate, awaiting a throw that would arrive too late. Edgar Martinez of all people had won the game and the series.

Our #1 hero will appear in tomorrow’s updates.

The Top 11: Seattle sports villains, #11-7

Everyone likes lists, which is why here at SSN we’ve created the Top 11. The Top 11 is a weekly listing of the greatest 11 Somethings to ever occur in Seattle sports history. Our Top 11 is much like a Top 10 list only one better…and 11 is also the number once worn by such Seattle icons as Edgar Martinez, Detlef Schrempf, and Marques Tuiasosopo, so it can do no wrong. Without further ado, on to the list.

11. Jim McIlvaine. It’s hard to do anything wrong when you don’t do anything, but Jim McIlvaine did all he could to disprove that theory during his short stint in Seattle. McIlvaine, the 7’1″ shot-blocking waste of space that he was, came to the Emerald City in 1996 thanks to a horrible decision on the part of the Sonics front office. Given a four-year, $34 million contract by the club, McIlvaine was supposed to be the guy to take the team to the next level, the perfect complement to the likes of Schrempf, Gary Payton, and Shawn Kemp. Instead, Big Jim (really at no fault of his own) set off a catastrophic series of events that drove the franchise into the ground and ultimately led in the Sonics’ departure from Seattle twelve years later. How did all this happen? Let’s review.

Continue reading The Top 11: Seattle sports villains, #11-7