Tag Archives: Mighty Ducks

How The U.S. Women’s World Cup Victory Compares to “D2: The Mighty Ducks”

That victory was amazing. Watching Brazil get fellated by the refs, try and cheat the game by faking injuries, then lose in dramatic fashion to the good ol’ U-S-of-A is really as good as it gets.

I should mention I’m talking about the Women’s World Cup of Soccer (not Quidditch, or anything like that), in case you missed the action. I don’t even like soccer, but that was one of the greatest games I’ve ever witnessed in any sport. A story you could not script.

Or could you?

I actually think we’ve seen this once before, circa 1994, in a little production entitled D2: The Mighty Ducks.

Continue reading How The U.S. Women’s World Cup Victory Compares to “D2: The Mighty Ducks”

John Calipari is the Gordon Bombay of NCAA basketball

mightyducksRemember Gordon Bombay?  He was the reckless coach of the peewee hockey team in Disney’s Mighty Ducks trilogy, a one-time lawyer sentenced to community service that found himself through hanging out with teenagers.  A wild-and-crazy hotshot who settles into the role of mentor in the first Ducks installment, Bombay regresses to his me-first ways as a sellout public figure in D2, the second edition of Ducks.  By D3, Bombay has left the coaching box for a return to the courtroom, though still cameos as the once-again compassionate, loving patriarch of the Flying V.

Such is the life of Memphis men’s basketball coach John Calipari.  From 1988 to 1996, Calipari was the on-the-rise head man at the University of Massachusetts.  Thanks to one Marcus Camby (aka Ducks’ captain Charlie Conway, aka future Dawson’s Creek co-star Joshua Jackson), Calipari led the ’96 Minutemen to their first-ever Final Four appearance, whereupon his team was defeated by eventual champion Kentucky.  Nevertheless, Calipari carved his own Ducks-like sequel, bolting UMass for the glitz and glamour of the NBA, where the stay at the top was short-lived.  In two-plus seasons with the New Jersey Nets, Coach Cal comprised a mediocre 72-112 win-loss record, all but punching his return ticket to the college basketball ranks.

Continue reading John Calipari is the Gordon Bombay of NCAA basketball